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Children Affected By Veterans‘ Exposure to Agent Orange


Blog Category:
8/13/2010
Advocate for the Disabled
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August 13, 2010 - There are a growing number of veteran-parents connecting their exposure to Agent Orange in Vietnam with illnesses afflicting their children. Agent Orange is a herbicide and defoliant used in Vietnam that contains dioxin, the deadliest ingredient in the mix. Between 1962 and 1971 The Air Force sprayed 11 million gallons of Agent Orange in Vietnam. Dioxin exposure can cause: 

 

  • Tissue Sarcoma;
  • Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma;
  • Chronic lymphocytic leukemia;
  • Hodgkin's disease;
  • Type II diabetes; and
  • Parkinson's disease.

The 1991 Agent Orange Act provided that all Vietnam veterans are presumed to have been exposed to Agent Orange. Further, all diseases identified by the Secretary of Veterans Affairs as being caused by exposure to the herbicide are presumed service-related. Veterans with service-related disabilities can collect disability compensation.

Agent Orange got into the ground, then the water, and in the troops' food. 40 years after the war, the damage Agent Orange caused is still present. Or maybe it isn't. C. Bernie Good is Chief of the Section on General Internal Medicine at the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) Pittsburgh Healthcare System. Good believes there is no tenable link between men exposed to dioxin and the birth defects present in their children.

According to Good, 2.3% of all babies suffer birth defects. Approximately 2.6 million men served in Vietnam, which statistically translates to between 52,000 to 78,000 babies with birth defects, without exposure to Agent Orange. Experts on Agent Orange exposure, while acknowledging the health risks for veterans exposed to the herbicide, say there is a much weaker link between that exposure and the veterans' children. Patterns in health problems of children of exposed veterans, however, continue to develop.

Because of the cost and the large amount of blood required to perform the test, the VA does not screen for dioxin. If the current pattern holds, there should be many more children of exposed veterans born with birth defects or developing strange cancers at young ages. Hopefully there will be some breakthrough before that happens.

 



Category: Veterans' Disability


21 Comments to "Children Affected By Veterans‘ Exposure to Agent Orange"

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Posted by Frances Gonzalez on March 24, 2014 at 03:11 PM
Im a unique case as both mom and dad had exposure. Mom was one of the RNs and dad was an airforce lt at the time. I was born with a cleft lip and palate. My mom im just finding out about her exposure to agent orange. I have some of the same symptoms as others ive read. I have asthma. Just recently I've been getting sick alot. Ear and sinuses mostly. I have the all over body aches my blood pressure is higher then normal when it gets checked. I recently sent in tye paperwork to the VA. Haven't gotten word back on it. But I have called and they do have it. Is there anything I can do to speed up the process of it getting processed?
Posted by meghan belk on March 21, 2014 at 08:41 PM
We need more information in order to better assist you. Please contact our office at 1-888-234-2341 for a free consultation.
Posted by Frances Gonzalez on December 12, 2013 at 08:17 AM
I am a 41 year old,child of a Vietnam veteran,lifer also,I often wander about my migraine headaches,asthma,an I was born premature in July of 1972,at a military hospital in Colorado Springs,Colorado.My questions are am I eligible for any benefits like schooling,an or financial compensation,because my father is dying right now of cancer from Agent Orange.
Posted by Robert L.Wiser on December 10, 2013 at 08:34 PM
Unfortunately, the Benefits for Veteran's Children with Birth Defects offered through VA are limited to children of male Vietnam vets that are suffering specifically from spina bifida. Additional disabilities and conditions are covered if the biological mother was a Vietnam veteran, but as for the male vet's offspring only that condition is considered "compensable" at this time. There are many advocacy groups working for VA to incorporate additional conditions for the male veteran's children, but at present this limitation is still part of the law.

Please refer to this section of the VA's website for additional information on the eligibility criteria for these types of benefits with the VA: http://www.publichealth.va.gov/exposures/agentorange/benefits_children.asp

Thank you for your consideration.
Posted by Frances Gonzalez on September 14, 2013 at 09:30 AM
My father is a Vietnam Vet and was exposed to agent orange. I am 40 years old and have had my thriod taken out almost a year ago. I had two nogules one had pre-cancer cells. I also suffer from high blood pressure and cholesterol. Any connection with Agent Orange exposure?
Posted by Shelly on September 11, 2013 at 12:11 PM
Unfortunately, the Benefits for Veteran's Children with Birth Defects offered through VA are limited to children of male Vietnam vets that are suffering specifically from spina bifida. Additional disabilities and conditions are covered if the biological mother was a Vietnam veteran, but as for the male vet's offspring only that condition is considered "compensable" at this time. There are many advocacy groups working for VA to incorporate additional conditions for the male veteran's children, but at present this limitation is still part of the law. Due to these restrictions our firm would not be able to assist you in filing a claim for your and/or your children's residual health condition as a result of your father's exposure.

Please refer to this section of the VA's website for additional information on the eligibility criteria for these types of benefits with the VA: http://www.publichealth.va.gov/exposures/agentorange/benefits_children.asp
Posted by Frances Gonzalez on July 25, 2013 at 11:05 AM
My father served in Vietnam and was also exposed to agent orange. He has suffered from really bad tremors. I don't know what other problems he has had because he left my mother and I when I was only 18 months old and came back into my life when I was 17. I'm now 42 and have suffered from seizures when I was 6 weeks old. I was put on s medication and they stopped. I had to have my adenoids removed when I was 5 because they were so large. The doctor had never seen anything like it before. I have suffered severe depression as long as I can remember. I have had tremors since Highschool and they continue to get worse. I have seen a neurologist for this and they could not find anything wrong. I have bad psoriasis and also have anemia. I never had problems concieving. For the most part my 3 boys are healthy but my oldest son who is 23 also has the tremors and suffers from bad nose bleeds which is also a problem I have had. My twins who are 17 have only had problems with their ears and had to have tubes in their ears. All 3 of them have really struggled in school which I also did. Could any of this be because of my fathers exposure to Agent Orange? I know that he had some testing done recently at the VA and they did confirm that this is why he has the tremors. Thank you. Michel
Posted by Michel on July 24, 2013 at 11:09 PM
Good Morning,

Generally, children who have certain birth defects and are biological children of women Veterans who served in Vietnam may be eligible if the birth mother served in Vietnam during the period beginning February 28, 1961 and ending on May 7, 1975. The affected child must have been conceived after the Veteran first entered Vietnam during the qualifying service period. In some cases, the child's eligibility does not activate until the veteran mother is service-connected. Please contact us for more information about applying for disability compensation at 1-888-222-2079. See the link below for more information, including a link to the application. http://www.publichealth.va.gov/exposures/agentorange/benefits_children.asp
Posted by Frances Gonzalez on July 24, 2013 at 11:33 AM
My brother in law was in Laos/VN circa '62-'65 as a marine. He has been suffering with chronic back ailment since 1971. His two children had cancer. His son developed lymphoma at age22 was in remission for 23 months but then it returned and he died of it 8 months later at age 25. His daughter was also diagnosed with leukemia at 25 and has been in remission for 20 years. Would any of this be related to AGENT ORANGE? My brother & sister in law aren't savvy to AO, so I'm assisting my neice for further research info with potential of him accessing all of his VA benefits possible, as well for his daughter and wife. Thanks
Lee Mason
Posted by lee mason on July 23, 2013 at 10:52 PM
Generally, children who have certain birth defects and are biological children of women Veterans who served in Vietnam may be eligible if the birth mother served in Vietnam during the period beginning February 28, 1961 and ending on May 7, 1975. The affected child must have been conceived after the Veteran first entered Vietnam during the qualifying service period.

In some cases, the child's eligibility does not activate until the veteran mother is service-connected. Contact us for more information about applying for disability compensation for yourself.
See the link below for more information, including a link to the application.
http://www.publichealth.va.gov/exposures/agentorange/benefits_children.asp
Posted by Frances Gonzalez on July 5, 2013 at 11:10 AM
I’m a Vietnam Vet and know I was exposed to Agent Orange. My son and daughter were both conceived after my return home from Vietnam. My daughter was diagnosed with Type I Diabetes at 8 years old. She is now 40 and has recently been diagnosed with Stiff Person Syndrome (SPS) (or stiff-man syndrome; also known as Moersch-Woltman Condition) is a rare neurologic disorder. My son developed thyroid issues at about 40. All of these are immune system disorders. Is there any information relating these disorders in biologic offspring to a parent exposure to Agent Orange?
Posted by Jay on July 3, 2013 at 03:55 PM
Good Afternoon Mr. O'reilly, it sounds like the VA denied you service connection for your residuals due to Agent Orange exposure. are you interested in seeking benefits for your son because you believe he may have
developed type II diabetes due to your exposure to Agent Orange during service?

Before you can seek benefits for your son, you first have to establish your entitlement to benefits for (1) a current disability, (2) due to your exposure to Agent Orange (3) during honorable service in the military.
You will need a medical nexus opinion, linking your exposure to a current disability. Later down the road, your son will need a similar medical nexus opinion, linking his diabetes to your Agent Orange exposure.
If you're interested in more information. we recommend you contacting our office for an intake at 1-888-222-2079. If we can get you service connected, you will have more options for your son's care.
Posted by Frances Gonzalez on June 27, 2013 at 11:44 AM
my son is type 11 with no history on eather side,,,and iam sure i have agent orange even tho va says no... have skin rash on hand that i put into a drum of orange ,,, sick of fighting with va
Posted by michael oreilly on June 25, 2013 at 09:16 AM
Jose - Good afternoon and thank you for your comment. Unfortunately, this particular situation is not one that our office would be able to assist you with.
Posted by Frances Gonzalez on March 28, 2013 at 02:57 PM
Wife and I had 2 daughters born with identical congenital heart problems. My daughter born May 24, 1977 passed away on Sep 3, 1977.Our younger daughter, will turn 34, on April 6, 2013. Angelita has survived 3 openheart surgeries and suffered a stroke after her last surgery at the age of 9..I served in Marines in Nam in 1969-1970
Posted by JOSE FLORES on March 26, 2013 at 11:40 PM
My husband was in Vietnam 65-66, had non-hodgkins lymphoma, my daughter had the same cancer. My question, will my son get this too? Someone told me that it would not pass (genetically) to him.
Posted by danielle ingledew on January 19, 2013 at 11:09 AM
my ex husband served in the war between the year 1965-1970 and he had two kids, one son that was born with low birth rate, missing thumb and heart problems.. his other son had two kids who were both born missing both thumbs and major heart problems. I want to know if agent orange could be the cause.
Posted by Evonne keeton on October 20, 2012 at 11:53 AM
Hello my name is Leslie Ann Smith My father is a Vietnam vet I have been diagnosed with fibromyalgia I also have back problems and recently I have noticed a vision change in my right eye I have been tested for diabetes glaucoma cataracts and I have none of the above. My vision is getting foggy in my right eye expecially in the sunlight. I was wondering do they cover children of male Vietnam vet I also have 2 sons that's the first learning disabilities anger problems 1 of my children the oldest 1 has been diagnosed with Aspergers syndrome my youngest son was born with ASD and VSD.
Posted by Leslie on September 17, 2012 at 06:57 PM
I always was aware that agent orange could have been passed on to the offspring of the vets.
Now I look at my daughter age 35 and see alot that her father suffered with is also playing the same role on her. Bleeding stomach, night terror, insomnia, addictive persoanality,loss of alot of weight, no longer has a monthly cycle . Hearing loss, memory loss,black outs, fainting, panic disorders, and Deginative hip and back problems and there is so much more that she has been dealing with..I beleive this is a little more than the average for her young age.

What a shame! that these children of our war vets have to suffer for the civil duty that a parent did for the U.S. and be brushed under the carpet like an old lady that does not want to really clean house. I saw it in her dad, and now I see in my young daughter just geting older, and sicker and wasting away,So many others out there that have the same problems.

It brings a mother to tears, Yep was a milatary brat also, so I got to see the effects on good old lifer of the army, my Dad , now also passed away with my daughter's father. I guess it will be her next. And not even a place for her to go and have a Dr even try to start to help or understand this nasty thing called AGENT ORANGE!!!!

Thank you for leaving these young people to just suffer with no help and or a hint of care and understanding or any type of a Dr. that might have a hint to their problems.
MOM
Posted by Barbara on September 20, 2010 at 08:43 PM
My daughter was diagnosed with thyroid cancer when she was 20 years old. Does anyone know if this could be related to agent orange exposure. My husband was in Vietnam from 1968-69. Thanks
Posted by Charlie One on September 16, 2010 at 08:41 PM

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